Tag Archives: Foteini Vlachou

Time and the Periphery

 

untitled

Written by Foteini Vlachou (Visual Resources, Special Issue: Medieval Modernity), the article “Why Spatial? Time and the Periphery” addresses a series of problems regarding the definition of the periphery in art history and its relation with the concepts of space and time. It seeks to disentangle the periphery from its geographical association by examining how it has instead been constructed as a primarily temporal concept. For this purpose, a tentative definition of the periphery is advanced based on the example of eighteenth-century Portugal. Also analyzed is what can be termed as the delay discourse on the periphery (patent in several national historiographies of art, with Portugal serving again as an example), which was criticized by Carlo Ginzburg and Enrico Castelnuovo, as well as Nicos Hadjinicolaou already in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As a way out of the impasse of different or multiple temporalities (and the implication of fast and slow time) proposed by art historians from George Kubler to Keith Moxey, this article proposes the concept of historical time as developed in the writings of French philosopher Louis Althusser (1918–1990), in his analysis of Capital by Karl Marx (1818–1883), as a useful category in deconstructing the ideological dimension of periphery’s temporal character. Rejecting both longue durée and a linear, ideological reference time, Althusser’s terminology and concepts offer an incentive to think anew of time and the periphery, while insisting on the fundamentally unequal power configurations that have shaped both the practice of art history and a discourse on the periphery that continues, for the most part, to be produced in the centre(s).

 

 

‘art in the periphery’ workshop – 22 May 2015

.

The last lecture of the ‘art in the periphery’ workshop for the academic year 2014-2015 will be delivered by Leonor Oliveira. Leonor is a postdoctoral researcher at the Instituto de História da Arte (FCSH/UNL), with a grant from the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia. Her research focuses on the relationship between British and Portuguese art, from the 1950s to the 1980s. For her doctoral thesis, she studied the role played by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in the promotion of Portuguese modern art from 1956 to 1969, and she recently curated an exhibition devoted to Paula Rego’s 1960s paintings at the Casa das Histórias Paula Rego (Cascais). Her research interests include the cultural and artistic articulations between Portugal and Britain and the history of art exhibitions and their impact on contemporary arts and culture.

The workshop will take place on Friday, May 22, at 18.00, at the Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (I&D building, room Multiusos 2, floor 4).

Paula Rego and classmates at Slade School

Paula Rego and classmates at Slade School (photo from the Slade Archive) – Paula Rego can be seen in the lower right-hand corner

New directions in Portuguese postwar art: Portuguese artists in London in the 50s

In this session the preliminary information concerning Portuguese artists’ presence in England in the postwar period will be presented and examined so as to assess the main reasons for this new migratory destiny. After the Second World War London ascended progressively from a peripheral position to a prominent place in the arts world, thus rivaling Paris. The 1960s vibrant scene confirmed the international standing of British art.

It was, however, during the 1950s that Portuguese artists’ migration to London began, as the cases of Jorge Vieira, João Cutileiro, Bartolomeu Cid dos Santos, and Paula Rego testify. This is a decade that remainsrather under-explored both in Portuguese and British art historiography. By addressing these artists’ experiences, it will be possible to portray the first impressions of British art and culture and its most relevant aspects. Furthermore, this approach will point out the ways through which these new references interacted with the cultural background of Portuguese artists.

.

organized by Foteini Vlachou – ‘art in the periphery’ (Instituto de História da Arte, FCSH/UNL)

‘art in the periphery’ workshop – 24 April 2015

.

Beato de Lorvao

Lorvão Beatus, Lisbon, ANTT, Ordem de Cister, Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Lorvão, Liv. 44, fol. 108v.

The upcoming edition of the ‘art in the periphery’ workshop counts with the participation of Alicia Miguélez Cavero who will deliver a lecture on the political use of medieval images in Portugal during the Estado Novo (see below for abstract). Alicia holds a PhD in the History of Art and is currently a researcher of the Instituto dos Estudos Medievais (FCSH-UNL), where she is carrying out a postdoctoral project on “Gestures and Body Language in Beatus Manuscripts” (funded by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia). Her research interests include the study of gestures in art, and the relationship between text and image.

The workshop will take place on Friday, April 24, at 18.00, at the Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (I&D building, room Multiusos 1, ground floor).

Medieval Peripheries? The Political Use of Medieval Images in Portugal during the Estado Novo

This paper falls within the scope of the study of political iconography and the use of images as a means of demonstration and legitimization of power. It focuses on a specific case study, the analysis of an image first included in a Portuguese manuscript of the twelfth century. Its possible connection with a political purpose beyond its original religious content will be analyzed, as it was again being put to use in the twentieth century during the Salazar dictatorship.

Portugal was one of the European countries where the medieval past was consistently rebuilt and rewritten in order to accommodate the (re)construction of the nation. It was the Estado Novo in particular that made use of history in the reimagining of the national community during the 1930s and 1940s, with the aim of legitimating its power and rule. Medieval images were one of the resources mostly used in order to establish an unbroken continuity with the past.

.

organized by Foteini Vlachou – ‘art in the periphery’ (Instituto de História da Arte, FCSH/UNL)

.

.

‘art in the periphery’ workshop – 26 March 2015

.

livraria

The next lecture of the ‘art in the periphery’ workshop will be delivered by Inês Fialho Brandão, PhD student at Maynooth University – National University of Ireland since 2012.  She currently researches the Portuguese art market during the Second World War, focusing on the interaction between the State and the refugee communities. Inês studied at the University of Edinburgh and at New York University before embarking on a museum professional career as a curator and as an educator.

The lecture is scheduled for Thursday, March 26, 2015, at 17.45, and will take place at Torre A (room 103, floor 1), at the Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Av. de Berna, 26-C).

Portugal in the periphery of Nazi-era provenance research

Between 1940-1945, 50.000 – 100.000 refugees entered Portugal  from mainland Europe. Among them were art dealers, collectors and artists. Simultaneously, important collections were formed and/or substantially enriched in Portugal. These events occurred against the backdrop of the Estado Novo’s enforcement of an events-based cultural policy promoting a national identity anchored to the country’s Christian roots and deeds of the Discoveries, presented in modernist language and aesthetics.

The interactions between these three spheres – refugees, collectors, state – has not been researched. Equally, the role played by Portuguese authorities and cultural institutions in encouraging or limiting the international circulation of artworks, is still to be determined. We will discuss the reasons behind this lack of scrutiny both by academics and museum professionals. The identification and contextualization of biases opens the door for academic attention to Nazi-era provenance research, which the Portuguese government has committed to undertake.

.

organized by Foteini Vlachou – ‘art in the periphery’ (Instituto de História da Arte, FCSH/UNL)

.

.

‘art in the periphery’ workshop – 27 February 2015

lotus_lobo2The ‘art in the periphery’ workshop is resuming its activities after a winter hiatus. The next lecture will be delivered by Giulia Lamoni, postdoctoral researcher at the Instituto de História da Arte (FCSH/UNL) since 2010. A specialist on feminist art and questions regarding the relationship of image/text, as well as the transnational and the global, Giulia Lamoni has studied at Trinity College and Universite de Paris IV (Paris-Sorbonne), and published articles in N.Paradoxa, as well as contributed texts in edited volumes and exhibition catalogues. The subject of her February lecture will revisit the question of “pop” art in Brazil (see abstract below).

The workshop will take place on February 27, at 17h45, at the Faculdade das Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (I&D building, room Multiusos 2, floor 4).

“Pop”/pops/popular? Exploring “pop” art in Brazil, by Giulia Lamoni

In Brazil, the period that followed the 1964 military coup, was characterized by a heterogeneous artistic effervescence. Experimentation was often associated with the articulation of positions of resistance and with attempts of expanding or creating new relations between art and spectatorship. In this context, exhibitions such as Opinião 65, held in 1965 at the Museum of Modern art of Rio de Janeiro, marked the affirmation, among a young generation of artists, of “new realist” currents, critically informed by Pop, European figurative tendencies but also by the vanguard experience of Brazilian concrete art and neo-concretism.

This presentation will explore the very diverse range of these practices – and their attempt to negotiate with hegemonic cultural models – while discussing the possibilities and difficulties of envisioning “pop”, as recently proposed by curator Jessica Morgan, as a global phenomenon (Artforum, February 2013).

.

organized by Foteini Vlachou – ‘art in the periphery’ (Instituto de História da Arte, FCSH/UNL)

.

.